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Sandra

Ageism, what is it exactly? Ageism is stereotyping and discriminating against individuals or groups on the basis of their age. The term was coined in 1969 by Robert Neil Butler to describe discrimination against seniors and patterned on sexism and racism

Butler defined “ageism” as a combination of three connected elements – prejudicial attitudes towards older people, old age, and the ageing process; discriminatory practices against older people; and institutional practices and policies that perpetuate stereotypes about elderly people.

I think the actual ‘ageing process’ is one of the biggest challenges many face today – any wonder though, when we’re bombarded with ‘anti-ageing’ advertising all day every day. Like we’ve failed by not being 25 anymore.

But as Diane von Furstenberg said, “Ageing is out of your control, how you handle it, though, is in your hands”.

Lanvin Model

In the pretentious and materialistic world we find ourselves in I’m afraid the belief that youth and beauty ‘rule’ will perhaps always be the case. But when you’re twenty or thirty-something you think getting old will never ‘really’ arrive or that somehow you’ll be immune to it – at least until decades down the track.

I also just love this quote from Carrie Fisher about ageing and the judgement that comes with it.

“Please stop debating about whether or not I aged well. Youth and beauty are not accomplishments, they’re the temporary happy bi-products of time and/or DNA. Don’t hold your breath for either.”

Carrie Fisher

The funny thing is when we get to a ‘certain age’ (men and women) we begin to embrace and or accept ageing as a wonderful part of life – finally accepting who we are. I know this to be true as I work with countless women of many ages.

The words of Coco Chanel ring true here. “You can be gorgeous at thirty, charming at forty, and irresistible for the rest of your life”.

With all that said here are several great tips for those that would enjoy the challenge and freedom of looking as young as they desire at any age.

65 years

1. Tone down wearing too much black – avoid if you possibly can and apply some exciting colour instead.

2. Wear lighter coloured frames if you wear glasses – avoid heavy black ones that may be a bit harsh on more delicate mature skin.

3. Get a well-deserved hair cut to a length that has you looking and feeling lighter and fresher – this alone can take years off your whole ‘look’.

4. Wear the correct size and style bra for a fresh and ‘perky’ appearance – even if it’s wire free.

5. A good quality BB cream or tinted moisturiser gives a lovely natural soft glow to skin and a ‘less is more’ appeal!

6. Wear clothes that make you happy but in the perfect size and fit for you. Show off your curves or any other part of yourself you’re proud of.

As seen in the www.weekenderherald.com.au